paper: pretty paper. true stories. {and scrapbooking classes with cupcakes.}: Layers of a story: Creating an interactive page

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Layers of a story: Creating an interactive page

layers of a story: creating an interactive page // scrapbook page by Kirsty Smith

With September drawing to a close and back to school turning to the countdown to half-term break in this part of the world, it seems about right for daydreaming about the summer holidays. Today contributing designer Kirsty Smith shares more about how she relishes travel scrapbooking.

Last summer, I went backpacking in South America, and a real highlight of the trip was the few days I spent in the Amazon basin in Ecuador. It was an incredible experience, living in the heart of the rainforest and seeing first-hand the stunning biodiversity. I also had the most unusual picnic of my life, feasting on catfish roasted in banana leaves in an open fire, fermented sugar cane drink, and, that’s right, roasted weevils on a stick. Disturbingly creamy on the inside.

While I have lots of pictures that I love from this trip, I don’t really want to make lots of jungle-themed pages. Additionally, the pictures go together as set, both visually as they contain lots of lush, green tones, but also thematically as they are all snapshots of a bigger story. It didn’t make sense to me to try and find a way to scrapbook each little idea separately; I think I would have run out of enthusiasm quite quickly, which would be shame as this is an experience I really want to scrapbook!

layers of a story: creating an interactive page // scrapbook page by Kirsty Smith

So today, I’m going to share a way to combine lots of photos, memories and scrapbooking across multiple page protectors into one, deconstructed layout. Trust me: it’s a lot less complicated than it sounds! I thought about what I wanted to include and in many ways it was simple: I wanted a lot of journaling and a whole bunch of photos, I wanted to make and embellish a layout, and I wanted a title that would tie everything together.

layers of a story: creating an interactive page // scrapbook page by Kirsty Smith

First of all, I wanted to organise my photos. I had a large batch of pictures printed as squares, as I like this format for my album, and I pulled out all of the rainforest pictures. Opting to include all my prints meant that the decision process was very quick indeed! I chose one picture to be a focus for my scrapbook page, and gathered the other 16 into a divided pocket page.

I grouped the photos by colour more than anything: the bright greens together and the duskier tones together. I found I had enough photos to fill both the front and back of eight slots of my page protector. This was one of those moments where I let the materials I had influence the design, and so I slotted my pictures into the pockets leaving the middle pocket free. Which gave me a cunning idea for my scrapbook page!

The pocket page of photos influenced my layout design, in that I made sure that the placement of my photo lined up with the empty section of my pocket page. That way, when someone is looking at my album, they will see a tantalising glimpse of the page underneath, but it will line up as though that pocket has a photo in after all!

layers of a story: creating an interactive page // scrapbook page by Kirsty Smith

Once the picture was in place, I turned my attention to the embellishment. The lovely floral motif in Shimelle’s Starshine collection seemed perfectly in tune with the exotic nature of rainforest flora. With the photo carefully in position, I used journaling cards and the cut-apart sheets from the Starshine Collection to create layers around my photo. I arranged flowers cut from patterned paper around the photo and trailing up and down the page to create the impression of foliage. A little camera icon was the last touch, as I like to include something that reminds me of travel.

layers of a story: creating an interactive page // scrapbook page by Kirsty Smith

Finally, I transferred everything onto a sheet of acetate. This is something I’ve done a few times before, and is a great way to sneak extra journaling onto a page. I adhered everything in place, popping up some of the flowers on foam squares. I journaled my story onto the background paper so that it would be visible peeking out behind the design. Placing the acetate on top means that lots of the writing is hidden; it doesn’t overwhelm the page and it seems a more organic part of the design. But it’s still very easy to read the full story by simply lifting the acetate. The page protector will keep the acetate lined up with my background, so I don’t need worry about attaching them.

layers of a story: creating an interactive page // scrapbook page by Kirsty Smith

Most of the elements of the page are now in place, but I had lots more story to tell which was recorded in my travel journal from the trip. I cut a sheet of white cardstock into 4×4 squares and continued telling the rest of my story.

layers of a story: creating an interactive page // scrapbook page by Kirsty Smith

If you prefer not to hand write, you could absolutely save yourself a lot of time and type out your journaling! However, as I was recounting a big adventure here, I was happy to invest the time in doing this. The journaling cards can now slot easily into the pocket page between the photos, with a paperclip indicating that they can be pulled out and read.

layers of a story: creating an interactive page // scrapbook page by Kirsty Smith

On a side note, if I can I like to journal as I travel. That way I know I can scrapbook those memories any time I like; I won’t forget because I have my travel journal to refer back to. In this instance, I simply copied what I had written down last August. I recommend trying it if you think it might take a while to get to the scrapbooking!

layers of a story: creating an interactive page // scrapbook page by Kirsty Smith

Finally, I created a hand-cut title to introduce the whole topic. I wanted the title to invite the reader to head “deep in the Amazon rainforest” with me, and to indicate that the reader can turn the page and find more and more layers of detail about this adventure. An overlay, or die cut would work just as effectively here (I simply don’t own one so I rely on what I can do by hand!) and allows you to peek through to the next layer of the page.

layers of a story: creating an interactive page // scrapbook page by Kirsty Smith

layers of a story: creating an interactive page // scrapbook page by Kirsty Smith

layers of a story: creating an interactive page // scrapbook page by Kirsty Smith

I like to think that overall, the reader gets a whole experience from this scrapbook layout. As they turn the page, they are pushing back the overgrown foliage with me, and exotic flowers trail around the design. The title reveals photos and the odd hidden detail; a paperclip indicates hidden journaling. The photos themselves give way to a scrapbook page which can be glimpsed through the pocket page, and the acetate of the page itself can be lifted to disclose further rainforest secrets.

I loved putting this project together, and while it’s not something I would do for every page, it’s tremendously satisfying to feel that I have all the pictures and journaling recorded in my album. And the fact that I was able to do it in one project, even if that took a little longer than usual, meant that I don’t feel I need to go back and create more and more pages about the rainforest. The memories are all there!

30 September 2016



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21 Comments for Layers of a story: Creating an interactive page

  1. kirsty a Says:

    I really enjoyed this. Since I stopped blogging 18 months ago Miss Smith is oneof the blogs I miss. Glad to see you still travelling and scrapping

  2. Sandy Lewis Says:

    Wow – gorgeous spread! Thank you – I learned some new techniques here that I will use for my grandson’s first year album :)

  3. Ginger watson Says:

    Wow! What a gorgeous layout!! How on earth did you cut that title page by hand?? Exacto knife? I’d LOVE to see a walk through of your process. Absolutely stunning and full of great ideas! Thank you!

  4. Karen Says:

    Love love love this!

  5. Lauren Elliott Says:

    This is AMAZING! Lovely page, and I loved reading your thought process.

  6. Jen Says:

    This is absolutely stunning! I am so inspired by this…love the ideas for packing so much content into just a few pages.

  7. Lisa Zepponi Says:

    Love this concept!!! Beautiful album within the album! Thanks for sharing!

  8. Dory Says:

    Just A M A Z I N G…..!

  9. Lisa Zepponi Says:

    I know I have already commented but I AM SO EXCITED to try this concept! I have several photos of one event that goes inside my son’s annual album!! I really think this will be a new fresh way to show the day w/out making 10 double page layouts!!! THANKS FOR THE INSPIRATION!!!

  10. Berta Says:

    This is an amazing LO! A treasure to find in your album. People looking at the album will definitely stop and really look at this, page!

  11. analyzedu Says:

    Tips or ways to Creating an interactive page have this article. Without that article it’s very tough to create such page. Now people who have interest in art create such page easily to follow the above the steps. The whole website is full of such ideas.

  12. Rosa Says:

    I stumbled upon your site while searching for scrapbooking inspiration & I love what I found here! :) I absolutely love how you designed these pages! So brilliant!!

  13. College Football Rankings Says:

    Nice post. I learn something more challenging on different blogs everyday. It will always be stimulating to read content from other writers and practice a little something from their store. I’d prefer to use some with the content on my blog whether you don’t mind. Natually I’ll give you a link on your web blog. Thanks for sharing.

  14. Poker Game Says:

    The next time I read a blog, I hope that it doesnt disappoint me as much as this one. I mean, I know it was my choice to read, but I actually thought youd have something interesting to say. All I hear is a bunch of whining about something that you could fix if you werent too busy looking for attention.

  15. Taruhan Bola Says:

    Your place is valueble for me. Thanks!…

  16. Youngmi Says:

    Gorgeous! I love all the texture and layers. What a great way to pack a layout full of photos and journaling without overwhelming it all. Thank you for sharing!

  17. Bertha Says:

    Great couple of pages! I loved the mixture of 12 × 12 and pocket pages and the acetate overlay and die-cut overlay. I will definitely give it a try.

  18. maria Says:

    What a beautiful l/o! I love the placement of the flowers. The title is amazing – you must have the steadiest hand in the world! Maria

  19. Golf Swing Tips Says:

    You should take part in a contest for one of the best blogs on the web. I will recommend this site!

  20. Susan Says:

    Shimelle,
    Trying to get in touch with you but the email was returned undelivered. Can and how do I send you a PM?

  21. Manor Custom Homes Says:

    I like your great work, I am happy to see this great post, please share with us more informative post like this I get more information to in it keep it up and doing your job thanks

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